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Full text of "The Nation needs corn to make into bread--to turn into meat and milk : cultivate your corn ... : put production of food crops first ... : produce the largest yield possible .."

Historic, archived document 



Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 




TO MAKE INTO BREAO-TO TURN INTO MEAT AND MILK 





Get better yields by keeping 

soil moist and warm 




CULTIVATE TO STORE MOISTURE 

Cultivate as soon after rains as the soil has 
dried sufficiently. 

Keep the soil surface well stirred and light. 
This will let rain soak in quickly and reduce 
waste. In fair weather it will prevent the 
subsoil from drying out. 

A well-stirred surface soil will send mois- 
ture, laden with plant food, up through the 
corn roots and stalks to make ears. 




CULTIVATE TO DESTROY WEEDS 

Every weed in a cornfield is an enemy. 

Weeds drink up moisture and consume 
plant food that should go to make corn 
kernels instead of weed seeds. 

Destroy your weed enemies when they 
begin to appear. Don't wait for them to 
mobilize in strength. 

Attack weeds if possible in fair weather. 
You will then have the sun as a powerful ally. 




CULTIVATE TO WARM THE SOIL 

Evaporation of moisture lowers tempera- 
ture. A wet, evaporating soil surface, 
therefore, is cold. A dry soil surface is warm. 

A loose soil surface dries quickly. The 
blanket of loose, dry soil then stops further 
evaporation. It drinks in sunshine and be- 
comes warm. 

In northern localities and at high altitudes 
the warming of the soil frequently is as im- 
portant as conservation of moisture. 



PUT PRODUCTION Of FOOD CROPS FIRST 



WATCH YOUR SOIL 

The condition of your soil should determine when 
to cultivate. 

Cultivation by a hard and fast rule may do more 
harm than good. 

DonH let weeds grow. Take the appearance of each 

weed as a danger signal of a raid on your plant food. 

DbnH let cracks form. They are holes through 
which valuable moisture escapes. 

Don^t cultivate when your ground is wet enough to 
form clods. Clods tie up plant food so that the corn 
roots can not use it. 

Don^t waste cultivation. Cultivation may be a 
waste of time or may be actually injurious when your 
soil is in good condition — moist below, dry and light on 
the surface, free from weeds. 

Failure to cultivate promptly and prevent the soil 
from becoming cracked, hard, or weedy may mean a 
material lessening of your corn yield. 



WATCH YOUR PLANTS 

Their progress determines how you should cultivate. 

While the plants are small cultivate as deeply as the 
condition of the soil makes necessary. 

Deep cultivation then is desirable if your seed bed 
was not well prepared before planting. 

Who would attempt to grow good corn in a small 
flower pot? Remember that hard ground can confine 
roots as effectually as pottery. 

Get your soil into open condition so that the corn 
roots can reach out for food. 

After the plants become a foot high shallow cultiva- 
tion only should be given. 

The roots have spread out close under the surface 
of the soil and would be injured by deep cultivation. 

Never cultivate deeply close to corn plants after they 
are a foot high. Such cultivation will break feeding 
roots and cause injury to the plants. 



PRODUCE THE LARGEST YIELD POSSIBLE 

Don't be satisfied with less than 50 bushels of corn per acre 



The average yield of corn per acre in the United States 
is about 27 bushels. 

With good seedy fair soil, and careful, timely cultiva- 
tion, we can and should double this average. 



Write to the United States Department of Agriculture for 
Farmers' Bulletin No. 773, ''Corn Growing Under Droughty 
Conditions." The methods advocated in this bulletin apply 
to humid as well as to dry sections. 



For further information apply to County Agent, State Agricultural College, or 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

WASHINGTON, D. C.